Juried Fine Art Photography Exhibitions in a Dedicated Gallery
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The Arrangement

Juror: Paula Tognarelli
Open 1/11 - 2/4/11 Artists  Reception on 1/16/11 3-5PM

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The tradition of still-life as subject matter has roots deep into the history of art, pre-dating photography as a medium by centuries (Ancient Egyptian, Greek and Roman works in tile, tempura, and oils among the first).  Fine artists in all mediums, photography included, benefited from the total control they had over the final piece; the art making began with their arrangements of the mostly inanimate objects they intended to represent.  As Vermont Photo Space Gallery owner Ken Signorello aptly points out, “…it is art squared, where one first creates a work of art and then another to preserve it.”

The history of still life in Photography is as old as the medium itself.  Henry Talbot himself produced the first photographic images using the inanimate objects of still life.  In its earliest days, utilizing still life as subject matter allowed for the lengthy exposures necessary for its initial technologies.  Later, in the early 1900s, studies in line and form of object contributed to popular abstractions.  In the 1950s, still-life concentrated on the kitsch, and re-emerged in the 90s after a few decades in obscurity, in perfect partnership with the new trendy super-saturated film stock. 

Overall, the genre has been largely ignored, despite periodic bouts of influence - surprising, for a photographic practice with so much potential.  We are able to manipulate the most minute of details, from choice of object (natural, man-made, found, created), to placement, pick of equipment and film, processing and post-production techniques.

What is still life today?  We want you to show us your arrangements, from advertising to record photography, the abstract to the obvious.  Whether you are an amateur or professional, you may have experienced your still-life photographs as some of your favorite images – Juror Paula Tognarelli wants to see them.

Juror's Statement:

As the juror for The Arrangement I used a broad brush in making final selection choices for this exhibit. I loved the fact that many photographers took creative liberties in interpreting the call and submitted work that moved beyond the traditional still life. I tried to provide a variety of expressions rather than favoring one particular style or methodology.

My goal first and foremost was to assemble a body of strong imagery that worked together rhythmically as a whole. That the work had to be crafted and produced well is a given. Often I chose an image in response to another image. As a result some favorite solo images were sacrificed for the overall articulation of the final "arrangement".

Paula Tognarelli


Juror: Paula Tognarelli

Paula Tognarelli is Executive Director of the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, Massachusetts.  Opened in 1992, the Griffin Museum promotes an appreciation of photographic art and a broader understanding of its visual, emotional, and social impact.  Tognarelli is constantly exposed to the ever-changing photographic landscape through the work of new and established contemporary photographers.  We invite you to add your still-life work for observation from her vantage point.

Paula Tognarelli is Executive Director of the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, Massachusetts.  Opened in 1992, the Griffin Museum promotes an appreciation of photographic art and a broader understanding of its visual, emotional, and social impact.  Tognarelli is constantly exposed to the ever-changing photographic landscape through the work of new and established contemporary photographers.  We invite you to add your still-life work for observation from her vantage point.

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